The Importance of a Spiritual Journey

Sometimes the universe has greater plans for you than you have for yourself.

So what does a "spiritual journey" mean anyway? What is a "spirit"? Do we all have one? Where do we find it? So many questions. So much time. Just kidding. I'll try to make this short and sweet. By definition, spirit is the nonphysical form of a person that holds the emotion and character of your inner being. Let that marinate for a second. Many of us are out of touch with our inner self. It's honestly more common than you would think due to the over-stimulating society we live in (surprise surprise). We are in a consistent rush for satisfaction. We get so caught up in the day-to-day, that it's not surprising we lose our inner self (or our spirit) unintentionally. Que our spiritual journey.

“The non physical form of a person that holds the emotion and character of your inner being.”

Reconnecting with your inner self is so important, primarily because that is how you grow. Look back at the past 10 years of your life. When did you grow the most? Were you present, or were you living your life in fast forward? When we live our lives in fast forward, we change for the worse instead of the better. We develop habits that are untrue to our innate selves and then those habits mask the truth years later, making us unsure of what is true and what is untrue. Comprende?


When I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism 7 years ago, it was one of the busiest moments of my life. The easiest thing to do at the time was to slap a band-aid on the situation and take the synthetic thyroid hormone I was prescribed. On the surface level, things were fine and dandy. Straight A student, decent relationship, supportive family, a fun side hustle, good friends. But inside, everything started to crumble. My body was crying out for something more and I couldn't dissect the need. "Maybe I should start going to church again," I thought, "Maybe I should sign up for an unlimited yoga membership." Soon enough, everything that was crumbling on the inside started to show cracks at the surface. Anxiety attacks, good relationships turned toxic, but most importantly: I lost my path. Desires that once drove me no longer motivated me.


Because of the relationships I burned and the turbulent character that I painted myself, I knew the only person I could go to for help was me. I had to go within. And what does that look like, you ask? It was a lot of walks outside with headphones in but no music playing. It was a lot of laying on my carpet, starring at the ceiling, cycling my thoughts through the truths and untruths. It was walking around with no shoes on so that I could feel grounded, and watching sunsets and sunrises so I could remember there is something much much greater than myself out there.

It took 4 years for what I thought was my "conscious" to tell me to reconnect with myself, when really it was my soul squeezing messages through amidst the daily internal and external chaos. By this time I had graduated college, dropped my successful career in fashion and started making a living off of researching and truly understanding the soul, the universe, self care, and making sure all walks of life are living up to their highest self by connecting to their inner self.

And if appearance is a concern... spirituality is one of the most important primary foods our bodies crave. If there's one thing I can promise you, it's that you will feel more full on a daily basis (your skin will clear, your cravings will dissipate) if you feed your spiritual desire. It doesn't mean you have to go to church or rub a Buddha's belly. It can be as simple as sitting outside in the grass or laying on your bedroom floor, understanding that there is a much greater energy out there that will always have your best interest in mind. Get in touch with your intuition and the world around you. Reconnect with your 5 senses. Feed your spirit regularly and the mindbody will follow.


xx

Isa

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Homepage image by Joanie Simon.